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12分钟电竞足球比分
12分钟电竞足球比分
12分钟电竞足球比分
12分钟电竞足球比分
12分钟电竞足球比分

ChineseMedia & Global Corporate Communication(English-language M.A. program)

时间:2015-04-29浏览:1653

-12分钟电竞足球比分


ChineseMedia & Global Corporate Communication (CMGC)

(English-language M.A. program)


ProgramOverview


Globalizationhas made this world a true “global village,” characterized bygrowing impacts of global media to all the spheres of our human life.All the villagers of this “global village” are being influencedby global media and their interaction with the respective societies.


Thisprogram aims to develop you intellectually as well as enhance yourprofessional skills. You will explore global media systems and theirpolitical and economic and cultural relationship with differentsocieties around the world.


Theprogram will have a core module on global media, which you will gainan overview of the contemporary landscape of global media by drawingon multi-disciplinary approaches of social and technologicaldevelopment. You will explore the powerful role of ideas, beliefs andvalues in media production and consumption. By engaging with theoryand research you will develop your understanding of the historical,social and political contexts in which the media industries arelocated and the academic debates revolving around such concepts asglobal news flows, cosmopolitanism, connectivity and the emergence ofnew social and cultural forms which are no longer tied to territorialnation-states and hierarchical power relations between nations.


Theprogram will also host a public communication module in which youhave a chance to explore how global media models have helpedcommunication in various countries (particularly inside China) forglobal entrepreneurship in terms of public relations, globaladvertising and global cultural issues. You will examine andparticipate in the process of content creation and distribution anddevelop your understanding of the role of strategy and planning,based on practices in China. You can learn how to communicatestrategically for business and cultural purposes and think morecritically, by tapping into the sphere of global communication and byfinally involving yourself into the major Media Project in Shanghaior at your home country.


Thehost for this program is School of Journalism and Communication atShanghai International Studies University, that has stuck to itsglobal teaching and research tradition in the past 30 years since itsestablishment in 1983.


Curriculum

BasicCourses (three courses, 8credits)

  • ChineseLanguage (Level 1, Level 2)

  • Cultureand Media in China

CMGCMajor Courses (fivecourses, 10 credits)

  • Globalization,Social Development & Media

  • PublicRelations and e-Media Practice

  • AdvancedWritings for Media

  • CommunicationsEthics and Regulation

  • ResearchMethods and Applications

CMGCElective Courses (10credits, three courses required for an MA Report)

  • DataAnalysis and Public Opinion

  • ComparativeMedia Systems

  • MediaRelations Management

  • CommunicationStrategies

  • Entrepreneurship,Innovation & Change Management

  • MarketingCommunications

  • Leadership& Organizational Communication


MediaProject: 2 credits(internship including new media project)


MAThesis


TotalCourses required: (30credits)


Coursedescriptions, including recommended books, general or specific courseobjectives, course topics, and “substantive rationales” (drawnfrom international recommendations for postgraduate degree programsin public relations), follow below.


Admission


ApplicationQualifications

Applicantsshall be Non-Chinese citizens with reliable financial support andcustody who are university graduates with bachelor’s degree and ingood health.


EnglishLanguage Proficiency

Applicantsmust have a good command of English, with one of the following: TOEFLIBT (internet based) test result of at least 80 points, TOEFL(computer based) test result of at least 213 points, TOEFL (paperbased) test result of at least 550 points, or IELTS test result of atleast 6.0. This requirement does not apply to an applicant who hasstudied for at least two years at, or received a degree from anEnglish speaking high school, college, or university.


Applicantswith IELTS between 4.5 and 6.0 or equivalent may be admittedconditionally. Conditional students will be required to pass anEntrance Examination in English.


EntranceExamination

EntranceExamination includes written and oral test, is held in late May orearly June. The exact examination date and place will be informed viae-mail by the Graduate College of SISU. The subjects of the EntranceExaminations are listed in the Majors of SISU’s Master’s andDoctor’s Degree Programs in 2015.


ApplicationDeadline: May 31.


ApplicationMaterials

1)SISU Application Form (Degree Programs), available athttp://oisa.shisu.edu.cn/.

2)Diploma and academic record in original or notarized copy in Englishor Chinese.

3)Photocopy of passport.

4)Personal statement in English.

5)The index and abstract of published papers and any other materials tocertify your research abilities.

6)Two original recommendation letters from professor or associateprofessor in English or Chinese.

7)4 passport photos (in size of 125px * 100px).

8)Application fee: 800 RMB (or 130 USD).

9)TOEFL / IELTS or certification from the institution awarding yourmost recent degree confirming the language of instruction is English.

Ifnecessary, SISU will require applicants submit some additionalmaterials.

Application fee isnon-refundable, payable incash or remittance (T/T). Checksare not acceptable. Aremittance with student’sname must be made payableto:

BeneficiaryName:

ShanghaiInternational Studies University

A/C No.:

022744-1001274409008903857

Bank:

Industrialand Commercial Bank of China, Shanghai Shangwai Sub-Branch

Swift Code:

ICBKCNBJSHI

BankAddress:

566 DalianRoad (W), Shanghai, P. R. China





















All the above-mentionedapplication materials and fee (or the voucher of remittance), whichwill not be returned, must be sent by registered or express mail to:

Office of International StudentAffairs

Shanghai International StudiesUniversity

Pleaserefrain from enclosing any cash in your mail.


TuitionandFees


1)Application fee:

800RMB.

2) Tuition:

23,000 RMB/Year.

3)Insurance Fee:

600 RMB/Year.
















ContactInformation

Office of International StudentAffairs

Shanghai International StudiesUniversity

Room 202, Teaching Building 2

550 Dalian Road (W), Shanghai200083, P. R. China

Tel:86-21-65360599;86-21-35372961;86-21-35372963

Fax:86-21-65313756; E-mail: oisa@shisu.edu.cn;Web Site: http://oisa.shisu.edu.cn/

1.Core Course: Chinese Language (Level 1, Level 2)


CourseDescription: Studentswill begin to learn basic Mandarin Chinese.


Textbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Tobe determined


CourseObjectives:

*Studentswill begin learning Mandarin Chinese.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Studentswill begin learning Mandarin Chinese.


SubstantiveRationale:

Studentswill begin to learn Mandarin Chinese for possible future professionalpositions representing international or global companies in China,and/or for communicating with Chinese business leaders, governmentofficials, and others who live in and visit other countries. Learningsome basic Chinese also will assist students while they are livingand attending postgraduate school in Shanghai.




2.Core Course: Culture and Media in China


CourseDescription:Students will be introduced to traditional and modern Chineseculture, with emphasis on current trends and issues. Chinese mediawill be analyzed through focus on the CCTV (national television),state-run Xinhua news agency, official and market-orientednewspapers, representative magazines and movies, and social media(Weibo, Wechat, etc.). Students will also explore availability offoreign culture/media in China, and Chinese culture’srepresentations and image in other countries.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


RecommendedChinese Culture books (choose one):


TheCambridge Companion to Modern Chinese Culture,by Kam Louie (Cambridge University Press, 2008; 424pp, $31.99)


Encounteringthe Chinese: A Modern Country, An Ancient Culture,by Hu Wenzhong, Cornelius N. Grove, and Zhuang Enping (InterculturalPress, 2010; 224pp, $24.95)


ChinaA to Z: Everything You Need to Know to Understand Chinese Customs andCulture,by May-lee Chai and Winberg Chai (Plume, 2007; 304pp, $16)


China:Its History and Culture, 4th Ed.,by W. Scott Morton & Charlton M. Lewis (McGraw-Hill, 2014;368pp., $19.95)


RecommendedChinese Media books (choose one or two):


ChangingMedia, Changing China,by Susan L. Shirk (Oxford University Press, 2010, 288pp, $49.50)


Impactof Globalization on the Local Press in China: A Case Study of theBeijingYouth Daily, by Shixin Ivy Zhang (Lexington Books, 2014; 156pp, $80).


TwoBillion Eyes: The Story of China Central Television,by Ying Zhu (New Press, 2012, 304pp., $19.31)


MediaCommercialization and Authoritarian Rule in China,by Daniela Stockmann (Cambridge University Press, 2012, 358pp., $95)


Howthe Market is Changing China’s News: The Case of Xinhua NewsAgency,by Xin Xin (Lexington Books, 2012, 175pp., $80.00)


PossibleSuppplemental Books on Chinese Media:


InvestigativeJournalism in China: Journalism, Power, and Society,by Jingrong Tong (Continuum, 2012, 280pp., $32.16)


InvestigativeJournalism in China: Eight Cases in Chinese Watchdog Journalism,by David Bandurski (Hong Kong University Press, 2010, 192pp., $22.03)


China’sEnvironment and China’s Environment Journalists,by Hugo de Burgh and Zeng Rong (Intellect, 2012, 103pp., $35.50)


ChineseInvestigative Journalists’ Dreams: Autonomy, Agency, and Voice,by Marina Svensson, Elin Saether, Zhi’an Zhang and Hongyi Bai(Lexington Books, 2013, 238pp., $75.36)


SpecificCourse Objectives (adaptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*Understandingthe major historical, political, social/cultural, and technologicalreasons for the past and current roles of mass media (includingjournalism, advertising, and the related role of public relations)and social media in China.

*Understandinghow public relations, journalism, and advertising are practiced andstudied in China, and the differences and similarities that existbetween China and other countries.

*Havingknowledge of major public relations, journalism, advertising, andother media-oriented theories, approaches and schools of thoughtdeveloped or adapted by China.

*Recognizingthat social, political, economic, and cultural factors have alteredmedia practices in China.

*Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on mass andsocial media in China.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*TraditionalChinese culture and Chinese modern culture

*Chinesenews production & content, including investigative journalism,Xinhua, etc.

*Chinesemedia industry structure, size, scope

*Roleof Chinese journalists/internal (Party/state) influences on them

*Relationshipbetween Chinese and foreign media/journalism

*Chinesenews media, other Chinese mass media, and the market economy

*Chineseentertainment TV production & content (game shows, reality shows,talent shows)

*Beijing2008 Olympics and the media

*Professionalizationand ethics of Chinese journalists

*China’shigher education in journalism, public relations, advertising,marketing, public diplomacy


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “global influences onthe practice of public relations” (p. 12), and that “Globalinfluences on the Practices of Public Relations” on the “followingtopics and issues should be present to meet the demands of rapidlygrowing public relations practice: *Understanding reasons for varyingdefinitions of public relations, strategic communication andcommunication management in different parts of the world.*Understanding how social, economic, political and culturaldimensions influence how public relations is practiced.*Understanding how public relations is practiced and studied indifferent parts of the world and the differences and similaritiesthat exist. *Having knowledge of major public relations theories,approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas,Asia and Australia. *Appreciating how cultural distinctions andsocio-economic and political particularities influence publicrelations practice in different regions and countries throughout theworld. *Recognizing that social, political, economic and culturalfactors may alter public relations practices, even within onecountry. *Appreciating how advanced global public relations theoriescan be used and applied in strategic decision making. *Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on publicrelations globally. *Understanding relationship-building andrelationship management across national and regional borders.”




3.Major Course: Globalization, Social Development & Media


CourseDescription: Studentswill learn the history and current forms of globalization, with itseconomic, political, scientific/technological, and culturaldimensions. The “positive” and “negative” causes and effectsof globalization, with different results by country, industry, andsocial class, will be weighed. Students will analyze various claimsabout globalization to understand to what extent they are accurateand not hype. Students also will learn how mass media play a centralrole in both globalization and understanding, and misunderstanding,of what it is and its effects.


Textbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Globalizationand Media: Global Village of Babel,by Jack Lule (Rowman & Littlefield, 2011, 188 pp. $27.95)


NewMedia, Development and Globalization: Making Connections in theGlobal South,by Don Slater (Polity, 2013, 242pp., $24.95)


PossibleSupplemental Book


Globalizationand the BRICs: Why the BRICs Will Not Rule the World For Long,by Francesca A. Beausang-Hunter (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012, 232pp.,$100)


SpecificCourse Objectives (adaptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*Understandingreasons for varying definitions and roles of public relations,journalism, advertising, media technologies, media companies, andrelated government agencies and civil society organizations indifferent parts of the world.

*Understandinghow social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence howpublic relations and journalism are practiced.

*Understandinghow public relations and journalism are practiced and studied indifferent parts of the world and the differences and similaritiesthat exist.

*Havingknowledge of major mass communication and media theories, approachesand schools of thought (including both public relations andjournalism) developed in Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia.

*Appreciatinghow cultural distinctions and socio-economic and politicalparticularities influence public relations, journalism, and othermedia-related practices in different regions and countries throughoutthe world.

*Recognizingthat social, political, economic, and cultural factors may alterpublic relations and journalism practices, even within one country.

*Appreciatinghow advanced global public relations, journalism, and othermedia-related theories can be used and applied in strategicdecision-making.

*Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences, globally,on public relations, journalism and other aspects of media.

*Understandingrelationship-building and relationship management across national andregional borders.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Historyof globalization in current and earlier forms

*Differingdefinitions globally of “globalization” and “development”

*Economicglobalization, with emphasis on China

*Politicalglobalization, with emphasis on China

*Culturalglobalization, with emphasis on China

*Positiveand negative results of globalization for various countries, regions,industries, economic classes

*Centralrole of mass and social media in globalization


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An appreciation for theimportance of globalization” (p. 5), “an understanding of therole of communication in society and the ethical challenges of globalpublic relations” (p. 5), and “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeedin public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “global influences onthe practice of public relations” (p. 12), and that “Globalinfluences on the Practices of Public Relations” on the “followingtopics and issues should be present to meet the demands of rapidlygrowing public relations practice: *Understanding reasons for varyingdefinitions of public relations, strategic communication andcommunication management in different parts of the world.*Understanding how social, economic, political and culturaldimensions influence how public relations is practiced.*Understanding how public relations is practiced and studied indifferent parts of the world and the differences and similaritiesthat exist. *Having knowledge of major public relations theories,approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas,Asia and Australia. *Appreciating how cultural distinctions andsocio-economic and political particularities influence publicrelations practice in different regions and countries throughout theworld. *Recognizing that social, political, economic and culturalfactors may alter public relations practices, even within onecountry. *Appreciating how advanced global public relations theoriescan be used and applied in strategic decision making. *Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on publicrelations globally. *Understanding relationship-building andrelationship management across national and regional borders.”



4.Major Course:Public Relations and e-Media Practice

(includingweb analytics and online community management)


CourseDescription: Thiscourse integrates both tried-and-true PR methods and tactics, andcutting-edge PR practices, with the current opportunities to use theWorldWideWeb for national, international, and global public relations(and advertising) processes. Students will learn public relationsapplications of all major social media, plus new or unique legal,ethical, and technological aspects of online public relations. Alsocovered is how to assess effectiveness of new and current PRpractices through social media analytics, search engine optimization,and social media monitoring.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


PublicRelations books (choose one):

NewRules of Marketing & PR: How to Use Social Media, Online Video,Mobile Applications, Blogs, News Releases, and Viral Marketing toReach Buyers Directly,by David Meerman Scott (Wiley, 2013, 464pp., $24)


ShareThis: The Social Media Handbook for PR Professionals,by Chartered Institute of Public Relations (Chartered Institute ofPublic Relations, 2012, 264 pp., $28)


SocialMedia and Public Relations: Eight New Practices for the PRProfessional,by Deirdre K. Breakenridge (Pearson FT Press, 2012, 176pp., $26.99)


LikeableSocial Media: How to Delight Your Customers, Create an IrresistibleBrand, and Be Generally Amazing on Facebook,by Dave Kerpen (McGraw-Hill, 2011, 272pp., $22).


WebAnalytics books (choose one):

Optimize:How to Attract and Engage More Customers by Integrating SEO, SocialMedia, and Content Marketing,by Lee Odden (Wiley, 2012, 256 pp., $24.95)


Howto Measure Social Media: A Step-by-Step Guide to Developing andAssessing Social Media ROI,by Nichole Kelly (Que Publishing, 2012, 288pp., $24.99)


SocialMedia ROI: Managing and Measuring Social Media Efforts in YourOrganization,by Olivier Blanchard (Que Publishing, 2011, 350pp., $24.99).


MeasureWhat Matters: Online Tools for Understanding Customers, Social Media,Engagement, and Key Relationships,by Katie Delahaye Paine (Wiley, 2011, 272pp, $27.95)


SocialMedia Analytics: Effective Tools for Building, Interpreting, andUsing Metrics,by Marshall Sponder (McGraw-Hill, 2011, 336pp., $32).


Miningthe Social Web: Data Mining Facebook, Twitter, LinkenIn, Google+,GitHub, and More, 2nd Ed.,by Matthew A. Russell (O’Reilly Media, 2013, 448pp., $44.99).


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Relationshipmanagement. Students should understand the characteristics ofpublics, distinctions between publics and communication audiences,types of publics, the concept of opinion leaders and the stages ofdevelopment of publics” (from the Commission on Public RelationsEducation in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, October2012, p. 12).

*“Strategicpublic relations best practices in a digital environment: This areashould familiarize students with ways in which digital and socialmedia are transforming the practice of public relations, includingtheir incorporation into public relations programs and campaigns, andtheir use in environmental scanning, informing and persuading publicsand building dialogic relationships between organizations and theirpublics” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, p. 12).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to...applyappropriate writing styles for specific media....” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).

*“Managementof an organization’s communication functions. This area shouldinclude management of people, programs and resources, as well ascommunication with an organization’s leadership” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Brandawareness & lead generation

*Web’sdisruption of advertising

*Web’snew dimensions of public relations

*Convergenceof marketing and PR on the Web

*Facebook,Wikis, Listservs, Twitter, LinkedIn, Google+, etc.

*Blogs& online thought leadership

*Audio,video, YouTube, podcasts

*Globalwebsites

*Mobilemarketing

*Instagram,Pinterest, etc.

*TheNew Media Relations, press releases, website newsrooms, etc.

*Searchengine-based marketing

*Apps

*Socialmedia and the law, social media and ethics (internally andexternally)

*Socialmedia analytics, optimization, social media monitoring


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An appreciation for theimportance of...entrepreneurship and technology in today’s businessenvironment” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problemsolving skills” (p. 6), “social science research and evaluationknowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communicationmanagement abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skillsto test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied publicrelations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Even themost recommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component:...digital media....” (p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes” (p.12).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s curriculum also include “*Relationshipmanagement....[and] Strategic public relations best practices in adigital environment” (p. 12).




5.Major Course: Advanced Writings for Media

(speeches,annual corporate reports, employee newsletters, customer newsletters,etc.)


CourseDescription: Studentswill learn principles behind, and skills for, writing speeches forcorporate, government, and NGO officials; and writing/editing pressreleases, press conference statements, annual reports, employee andcustomer newsletters, website content, YouTube video scripts,Twitter/WeChat posts, letters to the editor and other feedback tomedia, and other communications prepared and distributed byorganizations for dissemination to target audiences and/or thegeneral public.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Speechwritingbooks (choose one):

10Steps to Writing a Vital Speech: The Definitive Guide to ProfessionalSpeechwriting,by Fletcher Dean (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2011, 120pp.,$39.95)


Speechwriting:The Expert Guide,by Simon Lancaster (Robert Hale, 2011, 288 pages, $19.95)


SpeechRight: How to Write a Great Speech,by Chuck Snearly (Aventine Press, 2010, 184pp., $12.50)


Writing/Newsletterbooks (choose one):

BusinessWriting with Heart: How to Build Great Work Relationships One Messageat a Time,by Lynn Gaertner-Johnston (Syntax Training, 2013, 436pp, $24.95)


TheMagic of Newsletter Marketing: The Secret to More Profits andCustomers for Life,by Jim Palmer (Success Advantage Publishing, 2009, 210pp, $19.95)


NewsletterMarketing: Insider Secrets to Using Newsletters to Increase Profits,Get More New Customers, and Keep Customers Longer than You EverThough Possible,by Shaun Buck (CreateSpace Independent Publishing, 2013, 136pp,$9.95)


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Critical thinking. This area should include the elements ofreasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification ofpurpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, andconsequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point ofview” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to...applyappropriate writing styles for specific media....” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Writingspeeches for corporate, government, and NGO officials

*writing/editingpress releases and press conference statements

*Writing/editingannual reports, employee and customer newsletters, website content,YouTube video scripts, Twitter/WeChat posts, letters to the editorand other feedback to media

*Writing/editingany and all other communications prepared and distributed byorganizations for dissemination to target audiences and/or thegeneral public.


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communicationmanagement abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6), and “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...persuasive writing....Even the mostrecommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component:...journalism....” (p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”




6.Major Course:Communications Ethics and Regulation

(includingcorporate social responsibility, corporate governance, crisiscommunication and risk communication)


CourseDescription: Thiscourse is designed for students to learn about media law(constitutional, statutory and regulatory) in the USA and other majorcountries. Content will focus on the historical/cultural context formedia regulation, and the advantages and disadvantages of currentmedia law/statutes/regulations. Students will also learn how majorethics theories/philosophies from around the world are applied tomass communication (especially news media, social media, publicrelations, and advertising). Content will include both case studiesand ethics codes, examined separately and in conjunction with eachother.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


LawBooks (choose both):

TheGlobal Advertising Regulation Handbook,edited by Mary Alice Shaver and Soontae An (M.E. Sharpe, 2013, 272pp,$49.95).


GlobalInternet Law in a Nutshell, 2nd Edition,by Michael L. Rustad (West, 2013, 640pp, $41.00)


Ethics books (chooseone):

GlobalMedia Ethics: Problems and Perspectives,edited by Stephen J.A. Ward (Wiley-Blackwell, 2013, 340pp, $46.95)


EthicalIssues in International Communication,edited by Alexander G. Nikolaev (Palgrave Macmillan, 2011, 264pp,$95.00)


NEWTheHandbook of Global Communication and Media Ethics,edited by Robert S. Fortner and P. Mark Fackler (Wiley-Blackwell,201?, XXXpp., $XXX.XX).


SupplementalLaw books:

RegulatingSocial Media: Legal and Ethical Considerations,by Susan J. Drucker and Gary Gumpert (Peter Lang, 2013, 243pp,$38.95)


InternationalLibel and Privacy Handbook: A Global Reference for Journalists,Publishers, Webmasters, and Lawyers, 3rd Edition,by Charles J. Glasser Jr (Bloomberg Press, 2013, 592pp, $75).


Supplmental Ethicsbook:

AdvertisingEthics, by Edward Spence and Brett vanHeekeren (Pearson, 2004; 160pp, $50.35)


GlobalJournalism Ethics,by Stephen J.A. Ward (McGill Queens University Press, 2010, 296pp.,$29.95)


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Ethicalissues, which should include classical theories of ethics, profitmaximization vs. corporate social responsibility and current publicrelations codes of ethics” (from the Commission on Public RelationsEducation’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October2012, p. 12).

*Legalissues affecting the practice of public relations. Students shouldunderstand global (including China) trends, patterns and variationsin rights and regulations of speech and press (especially corporatespeech and commercial speech); laws government lobbying; governmentregulation of communication with investors (both stockholders andbondholders); invasion of privacy; product liability; andintellectual property laws (copyright, trademarks, service marks).(adapted from the Commission on Public Relations Education’srecommendations in Educating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).

*“Crisiscommunication. In this area, students should learn about the types ofcrises, stages of crisis management, crisis planning and reputationmanagement, principles for crisis communication and crisiscommunication case studies,” especially the legal and ethicaldimensions (adapted from the Commission on Public RelationsEducation’s recommendations in Educating for Complexity, October2012, p. 12).

*“Riskcommunication. Students should become familiar with models of riskcommunication; communication about risks, including natural hazards,environmental issues, food, health, safety, occupational hazards,consumer products, financial investments and terrorism; differentresponses to risk by diverse publics; and laws and governmentregulations that mandate organizational risk communication,”including especially the ethical dimensions (adapted from theCommission on Public Relations Education’s recommendations inEducating for Complexity, October 2012, p. 12).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Nationaland international intellectual property law (copyright, trademark,patent)

*Nationaland international libel law

*Nationaland international privacy law

*Nationaland international advertising law/regulation

*Nationaland international public relations law/regulation

*Publicrelations ethics

*Advertisingethics

*Crisiscommunication (crisis communication also is covered in both theCommunication Strategies and Media Relations Management courses)


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “an understanding of the roleof communication in society and the ethical challenges of globalpublic relations” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problemsolving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communicationmanagement abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeedin public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...ethical decision-making....Even themost recommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component:...mass communication law....” (p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles andprocesses...*Ethics” (p. 12).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s curriculum also include “Ethicalissues....Legal issues affecting the practice of public relations.”(p. 12).



7.Major Course: Research Methods and Applications


CourseDescription: Thiscourse is designed for students to learn the principles and processesof social scientific research methods (both quantitative andqualitative); to become acquainted with the major social scientificresearch methods (both quantitative and qualitative) used by masscommunication scholars; to learn how to social scientifically testand refine mass communication theories; to design social scientificresearch; and to begin thinking about which research methods is/areof particular interest and relevance to students for their ownresearch.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Chooseone:

MassMedia Research: An Introduction, 10th ed.,by Roger Wimmer & Joseph R. Dominick (Cengage Learning/Wadsworth,2013, 496pp, $179.95).


Mediaand Communication Research Methods: An Introduction,by Anders Hansen and David Manchin (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 328pp,$30)


ResearchMethods in Communication, 2nd Ed.,edited by Shuhua Zhou and William David Sloan (Vision Press, 2011,432pp., $43.95).


AHandbook of Media and Communication Research: Qualitative andQuantitative Methodologies,2nd Ed., edited by Klaus Bruhn Jensen (Routledge, 2011, 448pp,$41.95).


StraightTalk about Communication Research Methods,SecondEd.,by Christine S. Davis, Heather L. Powell Gallardo and Kenneth L.Lachlan (Kendall Hunt, 2013, $94.45)


Supplementalbooks:

QualitativeResearch Methods for Media Studies,by Bonnie Brennan (Routledge, 2012, 248pp, $49.95)


QualitativeCommunication Research Methods, 3rd Ed.,by Thomas R. Lindlof and Bryan C. Taylor (SAGE, 2010, 400pp, $81)


SpecificCourse Objectives:

*Understandthe differences between theoretical and applied research, compare andcontrast them, assess correctly when one or both are appropriate forproblem-solving.

*Understandthe theory development process through using research method(s) totest hypotheses, thus building, refining, and even sometimesrejecting theories.

*Developskills, including but not limited to decision-making,to manageresearch in public relations.

*Developabilities to assess the appropriateness of choosing, and be able toapply, data measurement techniques.

*Abilityto discern actual and possible ethical concerns in public relationsresearch and take appropriate steps to minimize or eliminate ethicalconcerns.

*Understandingof differences in descriptive and inferential statistical analysis,if and when to apply descriptive and/or inferential statisticaltools.

*Applicableknowledge of at least major qualitative research methods: historical,cultural/critical, case studies, social scientific in-depthinterviews, observation/ethnography, open-ended question surveys,ethical analysis, etc.

*Applicableknowledge of at least major quantitative research methods:closed-ended question surveys, polls, laboratory experiments, fieldexperiments, etc., including but not limited to random, universe, andpurposive samples.

*Understandingof and ability to apply techniques to increase internal validity,external validity and reliability of quantitative research methodsand applicable equivalent goals in qualitative research methods.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Contentand textual analysis

*Surveysand polls

*Controlled/laband field experiments

*Depthinterviews

*Ethnography

*Casestudies

*Legalresearch

*Ethicsresearch

*Historicalresearch


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6), “social science research andevaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edgecommunication management abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skills to testnew theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied public relationsresearch” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...research....” (p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include: “*Communication/publicrelations theory and research methods” (p. 12).




8.Elective Course: Data Analysis and Public Opinion


CourseDescription: Thiscourse fully explores the nature and measurement of public opinion,especially in the context of the reputations/images of countries(such as China), ideologies, corporations and other organizations,technologies, and various products and services. Students willexamine the roles of social media, public diplomacy (including “softpower”), corporate communications, citizens’ consumption ofdomestic and foreign mass media, and globalization. Students willalso study the acquisition, analysis, and ethics of public opiniondata, and measuring the effects/effectiveness of public relations andother corporate communications.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


PublicRelations Research book:

Primerof Public Relations Research, 2nd Edition,by Don W. Stacks (Guilford Press, 2010, 367pp, $59.00).


Bookson Reputation/Image of China (choose one):

Livingwith the Dragon: How the American Public Views the Rise of China,by Benjamin I. Page, Tao Xie, and Andrew J. Nathan (ColumbiaUniversity Press, 2010; 232pp, $30)


ShapingChina’s Global Imagination: Branding Nations at the World Expo,by Jian Wang (Palgrave Macmillan, 2013, 228pp, $100.00)


ChinesePublic Opinion books (choose one or two):

Blockedon Weibo: What Gets Suppressed on China’s Version of Twitter (AndWhy),by Jason Q. Ng (New Press, 2013, 240pp, $15.95)


TheParty Line: How the Media Dictates Public Opinion in Modern China,by Dong Young (Wiley, 2013, 256pp, $24.95)


Communication,Public Opinion, and Globalization in Urban China,by Francis L.F. Lee, Chin-Chuan Lee, Mike Z. Yao, Tsan-Kuo Chang, FenJennifer Lin, and Chris Fei Shen (Routledge, 2013, 218pp, $125.00)


SocialMedia in China: Supporting One Party Rule in a 2.0 World,by William Vogt (Long River, Press, 2012, 35pp, $4.95)


China’sCensorship of the Internet and Social Media: The Human Toll andTrade, by the Congressional-Executive Commission on China(Create Space Independent Publishing Platform, 2012, 78pp, $16.95)


ThePower of the Internet in China: Citizen Activism Online,by Guobin Yang (Columbia University Press, 2011, 320pp, $24).




GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Issuesmanagement. Topics should include identification of future issuesthat could affect an organization, research and analysis of thoseissues, consideration of various options for responding to theissues, development of an action plan for the best options,implementation of plans and evaluation of such plan’seffectiveness” (from the Commission on Public Relations Educationin its Educating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to develop strategicplans based on research, to write and present plans....” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Criticalthinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involvedin critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the questionat issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; andinformation, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*SoftPower generally, soft power of China specifically

*Countriesas “brands” and “strategic narratives”

*Thebig, favorable news stories: 2008 Olympics, 2010 World Expo Shanghai

*Sensitivestories: Tibet, Tiananmen Square, SARS, Sichuan Earthquake

*ChineseCommunist Party propaganda, the public, and the news media(agenda-setting)

*Nationalismin China and other countries

*Chinesecitizens’ domestic and foreign media use

*Globalopinions about globalization

*Onlinepublic opinion: Wechat, Weibo, Facebook, YouTube, etc.

*Relations(and public opinion about it) between China, USA, Russia, India, UK,and Japan

*MeasuringPR outcomes, and using measurement scales in PR

*Researchethics

*Contentanalysis, historical research, case studies, interviews, etc., asapplied to PR

*Surveymethodology applied to PR

*Controlledand field experiments applied to PR


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “an understanding of the roleof communication in society” (p. 5), “improved critical thinkingand problem solving skills” (p. 6), “social science research andevaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edgecommunication management abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skillsto test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied publicrelations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...issues management and research....”(p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management....*Global influences on the practice of publicrelations” (p. 12).



9.Elective Course: Comparative Media Systems


CourseDescription: Studentswill explore and analyze media systems in various countries aroundthe world, including China’s. Students will learn about thepolitical, legal, historical, economic, cultural/religious, andprofessional contexts for news media and other mass media in therespective countries, and the relationships between those contextsand the countries’ media systems. Students will compare/contrastmedia systems and critique theories of media systems.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials (choose two):


ComparingMedia Systems Beyond the Western World,by Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini (Cambridge University Press,2011; 356 pp, $29.99)


ComparingMedia Systems: Three Models of Media and Politics,by Daniel C. Hallin and Paolo Mancini (Cambridge University Press,2004; 360pp, $35.99).


ComparativeMedia Systems: European and Global Perspectives,edited by Boguslawa Dobekostrowska, Michal Glowacki, KarolJakubowicz, and Miklos Sukosd (Central European University Press,2009; 304pp, $50).


TheHandbook of Global Media Research,edited by Ingrid Volkmer (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012; 572pp, $205.95).


TheHandbook of Global Online Journalism,edited by Eugenia Siapera and Andreas Veglis (Wiley-Blackwell, 2012;528pp, $200.95).


CourseObjectives (adaptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*Understandingreasons for varying names & roles of journalism, advertising, andother media content in different parts of the world.

*Understandinghow social, economic, political and cultural dimensions influence howjournalism, advertising, and other media professions/skillspracticed.

*Understandinghow journalism, advertising, and other media content skills arepracticed and studied in different parts of the world and thedifferences and similarities that exist.

*Havingknowledge of major global, international, intercultural, andmulti-cultural theories, approaches and schools of thought developedin Europe, the Americas, Asia, and Australia.

*Appreciatinghow cultural distinctions and socio-economic and politicalparticularities influence media practices in different regions andcountries throughout the world.

*Recognizingthat social, political, economic, and cultural factors may altermedia practices, even within one country.

*Appreciatinghow advanced global and international media theories can be used andapplied in strategic decision-making.

*Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences, globally,on media.

*Understandingmedia-oriented relationship-building and relationship managementacross national and regional borders.

*“Criticalthinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involvedin critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the questionat issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; andinformation, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Mediasystems in various countries around the world, including China’s.

*Hallin& Mancini’s three models of Western media: Polarized Pluralist,Democratic Corporatist, and Liberal, replacing older models such asSiebert et al’s Four Theories of the Press.

*Roleof globalization and homogenization in various media systems

*Political,legal, historical, economic, cultural/religious, and professionalcontexts for news media and other mass media in multiple countries,and the relationships between those contexts and the countries’media systems

*Comparing/contrastingmedia systems and critique theories of media systems.


SubstantiveRationale:Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations (October 2012), included in its overallconclusions about expectations of professional master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include, “An appreciationfor the importance of globalization” (p. 5), “an understanding ofthe role of communication in society and the ethical challenges ofglobal public relations” (p. 5), and “improved critical thinkingand problem solving skills” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “global influences onthe practice of public relations” (p. 12), and that “Globalinfluences on the Practices of Public Relations” on the “followingtopics and issues should be present to meet the demands of rapidlygrowing public relations practice: *Understanding reasons for varyingdefinitions of public relations, strategic communication andcommunication management in different parts of the world.*Understanding how social, economic, political and culturaldimensions influence how public relations is practiced.*Understanding how public relations is practiced and studied indifferent parts of the world and the differences and similaritiesthat exist. *Having knowledge of major public relations theories,approaches and schools of thought developed in Europe, the Americas,Asia and Australia. *Appreciating how cultural disctinctions andsocio-economic and political particularities influence publicrelations practice in different regions and countries throughout theworld. *Recognizing that social, political, economic and culturalfactors may alter public relations practices, even within onecountry. *Appreciating how advanced global public relations theoriescan be used and applied in strategic decision making. *Appreciatingcross-cultural and intercultural communication influences on publicrelations globally. *Understanding relationship-building andrelationship management across national and regional borders.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Global influenceson the practice of public relations” (p. 12).



10.Elective Course: Media Relations Management


CourseDescription: Studentswill learn cutting edge media relations principles and ethicalpractices within the context of the globalization of journalism andmany news media, changing definitions of news, importance of crisiscommunications, and measuring effectiveness. Practices taught includepress releases, white papers, press conferences, media interviews,media kits, communication plans and appropriate responses to changesin corporate policy, releases of financial data, and investigativereporting, among other events.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials (choose one):


OnDeadline: Managing Media Relations, 5th Ed.,by Carole M. Howard and Wilma K. Mathews (Waveland Press, 2013;240pp, $30.35)


MediaRelations Handbook for Government, Associations, Nonprofits andElected Officials, 2ndEd., by Bradford Fitch and Jack Holt (TheCapitol.net, Inc., 2012;332pp, $27)


MediaRelations: Issues and Strategies, 2nd Ed.,by Jane Johnston (Allen & Unwin, 2013; 304 pp, $42.95)


Supplementalbook on media training:

TheMedia Training Bible: 101 Things You Absolutely, Positively Need toKnow Before Your Next Interview,by Brad Phillips (SpeakGood Press, 2012; 254pp, $24.95).


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Critical thinking. This area should include the elements ofreasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification ofpurpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, andconsequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point ofview” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to...applyappropriate writing styles for specific media....” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).

*“Managementof an organization’s communication functions. This area shouldinclude management of people, programs and resources, as well ascommunication with an organization’s leadership” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Majortrends in media relations (technological and other)

*Globalizationof journalism and various news media

*Changingdefinitions of, and channels for, news

*Goalsand objectives of media relations and how to measure them

*Crisiscommunication (Crisis communication also is covered in both theCommunications Ethics & Law, and Communication Strategiescourses)

*Ethicsin media relations

*Pressreleases, video press releases, white papers, press conferences (andspokespeople)

*Mediakits and media events

*Communicationplan

*Preparingfor news media interviews

*Internalissues (corporate policy, financial data, leaks, lawyers, etc.)


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communicationmanagement abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and and “Preparation to enter andsucceed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...persuasive communication, managementof communication, [and] issues management....Even the mostrecommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component:...digital media... [and] journalism....” (p.9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes”*Global influences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p.12).



11.Elective Course: Communication Strategies

(primarilybrand management and reputation course)


CourseDescription: Thiscourse focuses on the development, enhancement, and protection ofbrand management and corporate reputation through variouscommunication strategies. Specific topics of the course includebranch equity, brand extensions, strategic planning for brands,marketing brands, integrating reputation management into thecorporation’s culture and structure, and measuring all results.Communication strategies will be learned for national, international,and global corporations and brands.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials (choose two):


TheGlobal Brand: How to Create and Develop Lasting Brand Value in theWorld Market,by Nigel Hollis (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010; 272pp, $17)


TheGlobal Brand CEO: Building the Ultimate Marketing Machine,by Marc de Swaan Arons and Frank van den Driest (Airstream New York,2010; 320pp, $34.95)


RethinkingReputation: How PR Trumps Marketing and Advertising in the New MediaWorld,by Fraser P. Seitel and John Doorley (Palgrave Macmillan, 2012;248pp, $26)


TheNew Strategic Brand Management: Advanced Insights and StrategicThinking: Creating & Sustaining Brand Equity, 5th Ed.,by Jean-Noel Kapferer (Kogan Page, 2012; 512pp, $70)


Attackof the Customers: Why Critics Assault Brands Online and How to AvoidBecoming a Victim,by Paul Gillin and Greg Gianforte (CreateSpace IndependentPublishing, 2012; 256pp, $13.95).


ReputationRules: Strategies for Building Your Company’s Most Valuable Asset,by Daniel Diermeier (McGraw-Hill, 2011; 256pp, $30)


StrategicBrand Management: Building, Measuring, and Managing Brand Equity, 4thEd.,by Kevin Lane Keller (Prentice Hall, 2012; 600pp, $202.22).


ThePower of Unpopular: A Guide to Building Your Brand for the AudienceWho Will Love You (And Why No One Else Matters),by Erika Napoletano (Wiley, 2012; 224pp, $24.95)


TheHuman Brand: How We Relate to People, Products, and Companies,by Chris Malone and Susan T. Fiske (Jossey-Bass, 2013; 208pp, $27.95)


BrandAgainst the Machine: How to Build Your Brand, Cut Through theMarketing Noise, and Stand Out from the Competition,by John Michael Morgan (Wiley, 2011; 210pp, $24.95)


Audience:Marketing in the Age of Subscribers, Fans and Followers,by Jeffrey K. Rohrs (Wiley, 2013)



GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Criticalthinking. This area should include the elements of reasoning involvedin critical thinking, such as identification of purpose; the questionat issue; assumptions, implications, and consequences; andinformation, concepts, conclusions and point of view” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to develop strategicplans based on research, to write and present plans, to applyappropriate writing styles for specific media and to demonstrateeffective public speaking skills” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).

*“Strategicplanning. Based on the classic four-step RACE(Research-Action-Communication-Evaluation) formula, this area shouldinclude analysis of the public relations situation, organization andits key publics; establishment of goals and measurable objectives;formulation of appropriate action and response strategies;development of the message strategy; selection of communicationtactics together with their budgets and timelines; and evaluation ofthe plan” (from Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Leadership....Leadershiptopics should include personality types and personality tests,emotional intelligence, creative problem-solving, how to influenceothers, how to inspire a shared vision for the organization and howto deal with conflict within organizations” (from Commission onPublic Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations, October 2012, p. 12).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Brandsand brand equity: corporations, products/services, individuals

*Branding:regional, national, international, global

*Balancingbrand strength and business efficiency

*Brandarchitecture and brand extensions

*Globalpromises by brands

*Reputationsand relationships

*Strategicplanning for establishing, growing, protecting reputations, thusbrands

*Marketingfor establishing, growing, protecting reputations, thus brands

*Measuringbrand equity

*Managingmulti-brand portfolios

*Integratingreputation management into the organization’s culture and structure

*Relationshipbetween brands and local cultures

*Relationshipbetween brands and local economies

*Importance(or not) of reputation among nonusers/non-buyers

*Personificationof brands: perceptions of trust, warmth, competence

*Improvingbad reputations & crisis communication (Crisis communication alsois covered in both Communications Ethics & Law, and in MediaRelations Management)


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An understanding of theinteractions of the key functional aspects of an organization” (p.5), “well developed leadership skills and understanding ofbusiness” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problem solvingskills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication managementabilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied publicrelations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of strategic planning...management ofcommunication, [and] issues management....Even the most recommendedcorollary courses outside of public relations had a managementcomponent:...journalism and marketing....” (p. 9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes”*Global influences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p.12).




12.Elective Course: Leadership & Organizational Communication


CourseDescription: Thiscourse educates students in global best practices in organizationalcommunication, including theories, international and interculturalvariations, methods of organizational communication, and allorganizational communication skills, including conflict managementand negotiation, managing meetings, recruiting employees, and others.Current issues examined include Corporate Social Responsibility,leadership versus management, younger workers’ emphasis on“meaningful work,” and others.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials (Choose first book and oneother):


PublicRelations Leaders as Sensemakers: A Global Study of Leadership inPublic Relations and Communication Management,edited by Bruce K. Berger and Juan Meng (Routledge, 2014, 364pp,$49.95)


TheVoice of Authority: 10 Communication Strategies Every Leader Needs toKnow,by Dianna Booher (McGraw-Hill, 2007; 208pp, $24)


ManagerialCommunication: Strategies and Applications, 5th Ed.,by Geraldine Hynes (McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2010; 432pp, $177.32)


CommunicationStrategies for Today’s Managerial Leader,by Deborah Britt Roebuck (Business Expert Press, 2011; 200pp, $39.95)


OrganizationalCommunication: Strategies for Success,2nd Ed., by Theodore Avtgis, Andrew S. Rancer, and Paul Madlock(Kendall Hunt, 2012; 406pp, $73)


OrganizationalCommunication: Balancing Creativity and Constraint, 7th Ed.,by Eric M. Eisenberg, H.L. Goodall and Angela Trethway (Bedford/St.Martins, 2013; 448pp, $88.97)


OrganizationalCommunication: Foundations, Challenges, and Misunderstandings, 3rdEd., byDaniel P. Modaff, Jennifer A. Butler, and Sue DeWine (Pearson, 2011;320pp, $102.55)


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012)::

*“Leadership....Leadershiptopics should include personality types and personality tests,emotional intelligence, creative problem-solving, how to influenceothers, how to inspire a shared vision for the organization and howto deal with conflict within organizations” (from Commission onPublic Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations, October 2012, p. 12).

*“Organizationmanagement. This area should familiarize students with planning,organizing, evaluating, staffing, counseling, leadership andbudgeting in various settings, including corporations, governmentagencies and nonprofit organizations” (from Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,October 2012, p. 12).

*“Ethicaldecision making. Discussion of public relations ethical dilemmas, intandem with a public relations code of ethics, can foster thedevelopment of ethical decision-making skills” (from Commission onPublic Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Critical thinking. This area should include the elements ofreasoning involved in critical thinking, such as identification ofpurpose; the question at issue; assumptions, implications, andconsequences; and information, concepts, conclusions and point ofview” (from the Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, p. 13).

*“Writtenand oral communication. Students should be able to...write andpresent plans...and demonstrate effective public speaking skills”(from Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Managementof an organization’s communication functions. This area shouldinclude management of people, programs and resources, as well ascommunication with an organization’s leadership” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Theoriesof organizational communication (human relations, human resources,Theory Y, systems perspective, etc.)

*Organizationalcommunication & socialization

*Strategies& tactics to manage issues

*Roleof leadership in public relations

*Internationaldifferences in public relations (US, China, UK, South Korea, etc.)

*Powerrelationships in organizational communication

*Peerrelationships in organizational communication

*Gender,age, personality, identity, etc., and organizational communication

*Writingas managerial communication: reports, proposals, etc.

*Communicationchoices: meetings, newsletters, emails, social media, etc.

*Manageriallistening

*Managerialnonverbal communication

*Interculturaland international/global managerial communication

*Interpersonalmanagerial communication, including conflict management andnegotiation

*Recruitingemployees & conducting job interviews

*Relationshipswith suppliers/vendors, stockholders, competitors, media, etc.

*Groupcommunication & managing teams

*Managingmeetings

*Formalpresentations

*Preventingand stopping bullying and other harassment

*Ethicsand corporate social responsibility (CSR) in organizationalcommunication

*“Postmodern”workplace, search for meaningful work, etc.


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An understanding of theinteractions of the key functional aspects of an organization” (p.5), “well developed leadership skills and understanding ofbusiness” (p. 5), “An understanding of, and the skills necessaryto participate in, effective teamwork” (p. 6), “improved criticalthinking and problem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edgecommunication management abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeedin public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of strategic planning...persuasive writing,management of communication, [and] issues management....Even the mostrecommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component: organizational communication...organizationalbehavior....” (p. 9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes”*Global influences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p.12).




13.Elective Course: Marketing Communications


CourseDescription: Thisadvertising-based course provides students with an in-depth look atcultural differences in consumer behavior, globalization andadvertising, worldwide trends in advertising, political and legalenvironment for international advertising and public relations, andglobal market research. Students will also learn about marketresearch, product policies, pricing, sales strategies, andexport/import management on an international and global scale.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials (choose one):


TheHandbook of International Advertising Research,edited by Hong Cheng (Wiley Blackwell , 2014; 623pp, $120).


MarketingManagement: An Asian Perspective, 6th Revised Ed.,by Philip Kotler, Kevin Lane Keller, et al. (Pearson, 2013, 873 pp,$51; alreadyout of print?)


GlobalMarketing and Advertising: Understanding Cultural Paradoxes, 4th ed.,by Marieke de Mooij (SAGE Publications, 2013; 344pp, $80)


MarketingCommunications: A European Perspective, 5th Ed. (Kindle only),by Patrick De Pelsmacker (Pearson Education Ltd., 2013; 615pp,$50.28)


Advertisingand Societies: Global Issues, 3rd Ed.,by Katherine Toland Frith and Barbara Mueller (Peter Lang Publishing,2010; 264pp, $45.05)


Advertising,the Media, and Globalisation: A World in Motion,by John Sinclair (Routledge, 2012; 168pp, $39.95)


GlobalMarketing Management, 3rd Ed.,Kiefer Lee and Steve Carter (Oxford University Press, 2012; 578pp,$82.95)


GlobalMarketing,, 8th Ed.,by Warren J. Keegan and Mark C. Green (Prentice Hall, 2014; 608pp,$231.99)


Supplementalbook

TheStuff You Can’t Bottle: Advertising for the Global Youth Market,by King Adz (Thames & Hudson, 2013; 352pp, $29.95).


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Strategicplanning. Based on the classic four-step RACE(Research-Action-Communication-Evaluation) formula, this area shouldinclude analysis of the public relations situation, organization andits key publics; establishment of goals and measurable objectives;formulation of appropriate action and response strategies;development of the message strategy; selection of communicationtactics together with their budgets and timelines; and evaluation ofthe plan” (from Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Relationshipmanagement. Students should understand the characteristics ofpublics, distinctions between publics and communication audiences,types of publics, the concept of opinion leaders and the stages ofdevelopment of publics” (from the Commission on Public RelationsEducation in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, October2012, p. 12).

*“Persuasivecommunication techniques. Students should understand the historicalroots of persuasion; theories about persuasive communication fromdisciplines such as social psychology; and concepts such as cognitivedissonance, selective attention and retention, ethos, pathos andlogos, message sources (including credibility, charisma and control),message content and propaganda” (from the Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,p. 13).

*“Managementof an organization’s communication functions. This area shouldinclude management of people, programs and resources, as well ascommunication with an organization’s leadership” (from theCommission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity recommendations, p. 13).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Consumerbehavior and culture

*Culturaldifferences and advertising appeals

*Globalbranding (also covered in the Communication Strategies course)

*Globalizationand advertising (including WorldWideWeb)

*Globaltrends in advertising (including WorldWideWeb)

*Politicaland legal environment for international/global advertising/PR

*Globalmarket research

*Globalproduct policies

*Globalpricing

*Globalsales strategies (target markets, segmentation, etc.)

*Globaleconomic environment

*Export/importmanagement


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An understanding of theinteractions of the key functional aspects of an organization” (p.5), “well developed leadership skills and understanding ofbusiness” (p. 5), “improved critical thinking and problem solvingskills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication managementabilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to work in appliedpublic relations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeedin public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...management of communication....Eventhe most recommended corollary courses outside of public relationshad a management component:...digital media...marketing....” (p. 9)

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes*Communication/public relations theory and research methods *Globalinfluences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p. 12).




14.Elective Course: Entrepreneurship, Innovation & Change Management


CourseDescription: Studentswill learn about individual and corporate entrepreneurship, thenature of innovation, researching and planning entrepreneurialopportunities, and reasons for entrepreneurs’ successes andfailures. The course’s second focus is on change management in bothentrepreneurial and other organizations, including types oforganizational change (including strategic changes,mergers/acquisitions, reorganization bankruptcies, and others),recognizing the need for change, and communicating and implementingchange. Special attention is given to integrating support for, andprocesses of, change throughout the organization, and whyorganizational transformations often fail or only partially succeed.


PossibleTextbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Entrepreneurshipbooks (choose one):

Entrepreneurship:Theory, Process, and Practice, 9th Ed.,by Donald F. Kuratko (Cengage Learning, 2013; 624pp, $231.34).


Entrepreneurship,9th Ed.,by Robert D. Hisrich, Michael P. Peters, and Dean A. Shepherd(McGraw-Hill/Irwin, 2012; 640pp, $213.67).


TheEntrepreneur Mind: 100 Essential Beliefs, Characteristics, and Habitsof Elite Entrepreneurs,by Kevin D. Johnson (Johnson Media Inc., 2013; 268pp, $16.95)


Entrepreneurship:Theory, Networks, History,edited by Mark Casson (Edward Elgar Publishing, 2010; 400pp, $140).


EntreLeadership:20 Years of Practical Business Wisdom from the Trenches,by Dave Ramsey (Howard Books, 2011; 320pp, $26)


ChangeManagement books (choose one):

BeyondChange Management: How to Achieve Breakthrough Results ThroughConscious Change Leadership, 2nd Ed., byDean Anderson and Linda Ackerman Anderson (Pfeiffer, 2010; 320pp,$43.40).


ChangeManagement: The People Side of Change, 2nd Ed.,by Jeffrey M. Hiatt and Timothy J. Creasy (Prosci Learning CenterPublications, 2012; 148pp, $18.95)


TheTheory and Practice of Change Management, 3rd Ed.,by John Hayes (Palgrave Macmillan, 2010; 496pp, $46.13)


HBR’s10 Must Reads on Change Management(Harvard Business Review, 2011; 224pp, $24.95)


GeneralCourse Objectives (adoptedfrom Commission on Public Relations Education in its Educating forComplexity Recommendations, October 2012):

*“Strategicplanning. Based on the classic four-step RACE(Research-Action-Communication-Evaluation) formula, this area shouldinclude analysis of the public relations situation, organization andits key publics; establishment of goals and measurable objectives;formulation of appropriate action and response strategies;development of the message strategy; selection of communicationtactics together with their budgets and timelines; and evaluation ofthe plan” (from Commission on Public Relations Education in itsEducating for Complexity recommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Creative,innovative problem-solving. If CEOs are to turn to public relationspractitioners for input into organizational decision-making, it isimperative that practitioners be able to address an organization’sissues with creative and innovative decisiveness” (from Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations, October 2012, p. 13).

*“Entrepreneurship...[S]tudentsshould learn how to identify potentially valuable entrepreneurialopportunities, write a business plan, obtain the necessary resources,manage and grow the new entrepreneurial organization and create valuefor key stakeholders” (from Commission on Public RelationsEducation in its Educating for Complexity recommendations, October2012, p. 12).

*“Organizationmanagement. This area should familiarize students with planning,organizing, evaluating, staffing, counseling, leadership andbudgeting in various settings, including corporations, governmentagencies and nonprofit organizations” (from Commission on PublicRelations Education in its Educating for Complexity recommendations,October 2012, p. 12).


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Entrepreneurialindividuals: cognition, ethics, personality

*Corporateentrepreneurship

*Creativity/innovationand ideas/developing new products & services

*Entrepreneurshipopportunities & funding sources

*Marketresearch for entrepreneurial opportunities & writing a businessplan

*Whyentrepreneurs often fail

*Typesof, and types of leaders for, organizational change

*Recognizingneed for change, and what kinds of change are needed

*Buildingorganizational capacity for change & business processre-engineering

*Communicatingchange & moving people from resistance to commitment to change

*Changeprocess models, including collective learning

*Training& development for change

*Mergers& acquisitions

*Whychanges/transformations sometimes fail


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “An appreciation for theimportance of...entrepreneurship...in today’s business environment”(p. 5), “An understanding of the interactions of the key functionalaspects of an organization” (p. 5), “well developed leadershipskills and understanding of business” (p. 5), “An understandingof, and the skills necessary to participate in, effective teamwork”(p. 6), “improved critical thinking and problem solving skills”(p. 6), and “cutting-edge communication management abilities” (p.6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to work in appliedpublic relations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6), and and “Preparation to enter andsucceed in public relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of strategic planning, ethicaldecision-making, management of communication....Even the mostrecommended corollary courses outside of public relations had amanagement component: organizational communication...[and]organizational behavior....” (p. 9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes*Communication/public relations theory and research methods *Globalinfluences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p. 12).



15.New Media Project (including internship)


CourseDescription:Students will work in an approved internship in an international orglobal corporation, or international or global organization, in amarketing, advertising, and/or public relations (but not sales)capacity. Corporations may include: manufacturers/exporters,wholesalers/importers/exporters, retailers/importers, or servicecompanies, including but not limited to advertising/PR agencies,market research companies, news media, or other mass media.


Textbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials: NONE


SpecificCourse Objectives:

*Studentswill learn relevant knowledge and skills from their corporatecommunications-oriented internship.

*Studentswill complete a specific new media project related to theirinternship that is not required by the employer as part of theinternship. Such new media project will be completed with theemployer’s cooperation, but may be primarily supervised by eitherthe employer or a faculty member. In either case, the new mediaproject must be approved by a faculty adviser.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):

*Varies


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6), and “cutting-edge communicationmanagement abilities” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “advanced criticalthinking skills” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied publicrelations research” (p. 6), and “Skills to teach undergraduatepublic relations” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...research....” (p. 9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employerssuggested that they usually hired people who understood themanagement of public relations and not just the tactics of publicrelations....Advanced positions in public relations involved settingstrategy based on an understanding of client needs, the client’scompetition and the specific business settings....[E]mployersemphasized business knowledge. They also were less concerned aboutpublic relations knowledge and skills than they were about theindividual traits of potential hires, such as critical thinkingability, intellectual capability and curiosity....They suggestedmaking the [master’s degree] programs rigorous and selective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes*Communication/public relations theory and research methods *Globalinfluences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p. 12).




16.M.A. Thesis


CourseDescription: Studentswill research and write a global corporate communications-orientedmaster’s degree thesis, under the supervision of a master’sthesis committee. The master’s degree thesis must include originalresearch by the student conducted by one or more standard socialscientific methodologies. The thesis’s theoretical orientation maybe mass communication- and/or business/management based.


Textbook(s)and/or Other instructional materials:


Asappropriate


SpecificCourse Objectives:

*Thestudent will write a global corporate communications-orientedmaster’s degree thesis, after having an original topic andappropriate social scientific research method approved by facultyadvisers, and having gathered sufficient relevant data/evidence.

*Thestudents’ M.A. thesis will test/elaborate on at least one globalcorporate communications- oriented theory drawn scholarly literaturein mass communication and/or business/management.


SpecificTopics Covered by Course (may or may not mirror textbook[s]):


*Asappropriate


SubstantiveRationale: Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of professional master’s degree programs inpublic relations that they include, “improved critical thinking andproblem solving skills” (p. 6), and “social science research andevaluation knowledge and skills” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012), included in its overall conclusionsabout expectations of academically-oriented master’s degreeprograms in public relations that they include: “Thorough knowledgeof public relations theories and principles” (p. 6), “advancedcritical thinking skills” (p. 6), “social science research skillsto test new theories” (p. 6), “Skills to work in applied publicrelations research” (p. 6), “Skills to teach undergraduate publicrelations” (p. 6), and “Preparation to enter and succeed inpublic relations doctoral programs” (p. 6).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) more specifically said, “Participantsreaffirmed the need for a mastery of language in oral and writtenform and agreed that a master’s degree curriculum needed to includeinstruction in the skills of...research....” (p. 9).

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) also concluded that “employers....wereless concerned about public relations knowledge and skills than theywere about the individual traits of potential hires, such as criticalthinking ability, intellectual capability and curiosity....Theysuggested making the [master’s degree] programs rigorous andselective.”

Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012) recommended that a public relationsmaster’s degree’s core curriculum include “*Strategic publicrelations management *Basic business principles and processes*Communication/public relations theory and research methods *Globalinfluences on the practice of public relations *Ethics” (p. 12).


APPENDIX


ThisM.A. program’s curriculum includes all, or nearly all, theoreticalcontent areas recommended by the Commissionon Public Relations Education in its Educating for Complexityrecommendations (October 2012):


*Publicrelations’ contribution to organizational effectiveness; models ofpublic relations (theory)

*Publicsand activism theory

*Ethicalframeworks/theories

*Gametheory

*Contingencytheory

*Rhetoricand persuasion theories

*Issuesmanagement theories

*Crisisand risk management theories

*Socialconstructivism and social construction theory

*Co-creationalapproach (theory)

*Dialogictheory

*Systemstheory

*Socialinfluence and public opinion formation theories

*Criticaltheory

*Structurationtheory

*Cognitivedissonance theory

*Agendasetting theory

*Usesand gratifications construct/approach (quasi-theoretical)

*Diffusionof innovations and consumer behavior theories

*Co-orientationtheory

*Computer-mediated/newtechnologies theories



















12分钟电竞足球比分
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